Notes from the GLS

It’s been a full day at the Global Leadership Summit hosted by Willowcreek Church.  We have 6 staffers from ECC.  It’s great to be able to learn together and process how we can grow together and seek first the kingdom.  So here are a few notes from the first day…

Bill Hybels is the senior pastor of Willowcreek and he challenged us in a couple different ways…

  1.  “Armed with enough humility, leaders can learn from anyone.”  This is a great reminder.  We should NEVER stop learning and we can learn from ANYONE.  We can learn from students, grandparents and even unbelievers.  Let’s be humble and learn….
  2. “Spend 15 min every morning reading/reflect on your life.”  How can we do this?  Journal?  Yes.  I have realized that I need to get back to journaling and ask the following questions:  Who am I becoming?  Am I surrendered to God?
  3. “Am I leading at home as well as I’m leading at work?”  We need to lead well and love well at home.  So for me, I am asking myself, “What plans do I need to make?”

Fredrik Haren is a business creativity expert from Sweden and now lives in Asia.  I was a bit skeptical, but he was great.  He ended his talk with this challenge:

  • “Create!-you do this by doing creative things yourself as a leader because people are inspired to be creative.”  This is a great challenge for me.   I want people to think, “If he can do it.  I can do it!”  And when we create, we are modeling our Creator God.  Let’s create.

Brian Stevenson is a lawyer in Birmingham, Alabama.  He defends children and inmates on death-row.  He challenged us to take 4 steps.

1.  Get close in proximity to broken people.  This will give you compassion and passion.
2.  Change the Narrative.  Many times we make decisions based on our story of the world.  We have a story of redemption.  Let’s work to love people to bring about change.
3.  Stay hopeful.  Living with broken people is hard.  Stay hopeful.
4.  Do uncomfortable things.  The world is a dark place and it’s hard, but we must do hard, uncomfortable things.  Jesus came to earth to die…we are called to live in the same way.
I don’t know if those things grabbed you, but I something jumped out to you.  Let’s all lead together as we glorify God and help others worship.

Worship challenges secularism because it establishes a relationship with God and sets the world in order. In worship, the good news is happening again. It reaffirms the reality of God, the significance of life, and the worth of the human person.

-Robert Webber, Worship Is a Verb: Celebrating God’s Mighty Deeds of Salvation, Second Edition

Worship lifts the worshiper out of drudgery and brings meaning to life. Worship links the worshiper with that common set of memories which belong to the Christian family. The memory of Christ and the connection with Christian people throughout history and around the world is made though the celebration of those sacred events of the church year. This happens in every weekly celebration.

-Robert Webber, Worship Is a Verb: Celebrating God’s Mighty Deeds of Salvation, Second Edition

True worship stands in opposition to the secular trend that repudiates the supernatural. Secularization says all that is, is what is. It argues that there is nothing outside of human existence to give life meaning or value. The secular attitude insists that humans are left to create their own meaning, value, and identity. But in the celebration of the Christ-event, worship affirms the supernatural, sanctions the past, and creates confidence in the future.

-Robert Webber, Worship Is a Verb: Celebrating God’s Mighty Deeds of Salvation, Second Edition

Biblical worship is rooted in an event that is to be lived, not proven. . . . In Christian worship we are not merely asked to believe in Jesus Christ, but to live, die, and be resurrected again with him. Life is not an intellectual construct, but a journey of death and rebirth. When our life story is brought up into the story of Christ’s life, death, and resurrection, it then gains meaning and purpose.

-Robert Webber, Worship Is a Verb: Celebrating God’s Mighty Deeds of Salvation, Second Edition

A Child of God

 

He sees me and instantly his eyes light up and a smile covers his whole face.  When I nuzzle his neck and pretend like I’m eating him he laughs with pure joy.  I sing and he stops what he is doing to gaze at me with eyes full of wonder.  Later, when he is getting tired, he grabs ahold of my shirt and pulls his head into my chest to find comfort and then sleep.

Yes. These last few months have been ones of sleepless nights and poopy diapers, but even more so, they have been filled with wonder and joy.  I don’t have any long profound message for you except to say that I’m realizing again what it means to be a child of God.  This is exactly what Jesus meant when he said,

“Let the little children come to me, and do not hinder them, for the kingdom of heaven belongs to such as these.”

Do I look for God and does my heart light up when I catch glimpses of his glory?

Do I laugh with pure joy at his gifts and love?

Do I stop what I’m doing to listen with wide-eyed wonder at his creation?

Do I go to him and find rest in his arms?

It is in these simple life moments that I am filled with such love for my new, little son.  And as I lay him down to sleep in his crib and he rolls over onto his side, (Don’t do that, kid!  Haven’t you heard of SIDS??!?!?) I remember that I too am a child of God.

“Let the little children come to me, and do not hinder them, for the kingdom of heaven belongs to such as these.”

Prayer in Process…

Every week we walk through doors at ECC we see four words.

Pursue.  Prayer.  Preparation.  Participation.

Recently, we started asking some questions.

“How are we doing with those words?”

We have had a variety of answers, but one of them haunts me and is something our staff is working on.

Prayer.

The last two weekends, we talked with our teams about focusing more on God’s worthiness in our prayer times before service.  Our church staff is also meeting with Daniel Henderson throughout the year to learn and grow in our leadership.  Our first meeting with him was a week ago and helpful for us.  We are also reading Henderson’s book, “Old Paths / New Power” and a few quotes have jumped out at me.  He writes…

“If we have not time we must make time, for if God has given us time for secondary duties, He must have given us time for primary ones, and to draw near to Him is a primary duty…”

“To be effective, these priorities must relentlessly shape your schedule.  Each week the calendar must be organized around these commitments.  Otherwise distractions will tank effectiveness.”

This is true.  Whether we like to admit it or not, we make time for the things that are important to us.  Last week was busy for me, but I made sure to run out of the office in time to see my daughter’s soccer game in the late afternoon.  (They lost.)

How will it change us if we take time out of our schedule?  I don’t know, but we’re going to find out.  We will take a bit more time on the weekends to praise God for who he is.  I am taking a 1/2 day once a month to get away and pray.  Now, I might miss a month here and there and it doesn’t have to be a whole 1/2 a day.  The point is that I am working on my awareness of God’s presence in the normal parts of my day and redeeming time even if it’s just in the car or running outside in the morning.

So like I said, I don’t know how it will change us or myself.  I’m guessing that the process is the point as much as the outcome.

But we’re going to see…

God who spoke will speak through the Word. God who acted will act in our worship. [We need] a restoration of the supernatural, an expectancy that God will be present to us in our worship to touch us, to heal us, and to make us whole.

-Robert Webber, Worship Is a Verb: Celebrating God’s Mighty Deeds of Salvation, Second Edition

DAVID: the one-man musical

It was a small stage with 60-70 people in the audience.  all-for-One’s artistic director introduced the show and the people clapped as I walked onstage to begin a 30 min preview of DAVID.  I was a little nervous, but I was prepared and felt called to share this story.

It’s the story of a man who is known as a singer/songwriter, warrior and king.  It’s the story of a man who was known for his pure heart and yet committed terrible sin against Uriah, Bathsheeba and others.  But mostly, it’s a story of a powerful God and the man who tried to express his love for God in song.

As I start to prepare all the songs and characters again for July 8/9, when I present the same preview at Emmanuel Community Church, I wanted to share some scenes from the first preview.  Here is a small sneak peak into DAVID…

At the top of the show, the prophet Samuel anoints David.  The Spirit of God enters David and empowers him for the rest of his life…

The Philistines gather their troops and attack Israel…

The Philistine champion, Goliath of Gath, steps out from the frontlines and issues his challenge, “Give me a man and let us fight it out together!”

David hits the giant hard in the head and Goliath falls, facedown in the dirt!

As the Israelite army heads home, the women come out from the villages to welcome King Saul.  For fun they sing, “Saul has killed his thousands, David his tens of thousands.”

Filled with jealousy, Saul tries to kill David.  David sings a song of justice to God.  “O Lord my God, I take refuge in you / Save me and deliver me, from all who would pursue…”

Saul discovers that Michal, his daughter, is in love with David.  Thinking the Philistines will get rid of David for him, Saul challenges David to kill 100 Philistines to get Michal as his wife.  David does it and Saul gives his daughter, Michal, to David in marriage…

Then God sends a dark mood to afflict Saul.  It takes control of him.  He is at home with his spear while David is (again!) playing music.  Saul tries to pin him to the wall…

David escapes and sings to God.  “Deliver me from my enemies, O God / Protect me from those who rise up against me…”

David runs to Nob and talks to Ahimelech the priest.  Ahimelech gives him the holy bread, taken from the presence of God, and also Goliath’s sword.  David escapes to Gath…

David is recognized by the Philistines.  Afraid for his life, David pretends to be insane.  When he escapes he sings his thanks to God, “In God, whose Word I praise / In God I trust, I will not be afraid / What can mortal man do to me?”

This is just the beginning of David’s life and only the first 30 min of the show.  I’m excited to present these characters, these songs and THIS STORY on July 8/9 because I think it will help all of us see a man who was flawed, but who loved the Lord with his whole heart.